Is this the perfect home office?

Build a creative space for when you’re working from home The number of people now working from home has increased to almost one in seven over the past decade. According to figures from the Office for National Statistics, that’s 13.7% of the workforce and more than four million people. Of course, the figure for those who work remotely one or two days a week is even greater than that, but the challenges of creating a physical space that feels like an office, in which you can shut the door at the end of the day and ‘go home’, remain the

Schools fit for a future King

As William and Kate consider where to send George and Charlotte to school, our resident expert has some advice up her sleeve, from pre-prep upwardsBy Catherine Stoker
As Princess Charlotte has celebrated her first birthday and Prince George has started his education at a local nursery close to the family’s country home in Norfolk, no doubt The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are beginning the inevitable discussions all parents have when it comes to planning their children’s future school choices.
Just as with all parents, there are many factors for The Cambridges to consider in starting out on the school research process.

The best hotels in Britain

From city breaks and family trips to romantic weekends and coastal resorts, here’s our guide to the best hotels in Britain. The Nare, Roseland Peninsula, Cornwall (above)
Overlooking the sea between Falmouth and St Austell, this family-owned hotel has undergone a transformation since its acquisition by Bettye Gray. It’s now owned and run by her grandson, Toby Ashworth, who continues the tradition of unstuffy elegance with superb service—patrons keep going back(01872 501111; www.narehotel.co.uk)
The Ritz, London W1
Overlooking Green Park in the heart of London, The Ritz, founded 110 years ago, maintains its position as the last word in stylish luxury(www.theritzlondon.com; 020–7493

The best pubs in Britain

From brilliant beer and fine wines to first-class food and scenic locations, we reveal our list of our favourite public houses. Blue Lion, East Witton, North Yorkshire
Delightful Georgian inn on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Civilised and yet informally friendly, there’s a bar with flagstones and a log fire, an impressive wine list, local ales and lots of whiskies, delicious food and lovely bedrooms—and the staff are kind to dogs(01969 624 273; www.thebluelion.co.uk)
Rose & Crown, Snettisham, Norfolk
There’s something for everyone in this consistently well-run inn and the meandering
bars have simple, distinct charm, with
old quarry tiles, beams in

Waldorf Rome Cavalieri – Review

Sitting on a high hill above the splendour of the city, the Waldorf Rome Cavalieri turns out to be a great base for spending time in this hectic, marvellous, romanic cityHigh on a hill in Rome, Waldorf Astoria’s Cavalieri is a stylish oasis sitting high above the bustle of the city. In the heat of summer it’s a real treat to head up to this haven surrounded by fifteen acres of greenery; and the view across the Vatican City, St Peter’s Basilica and the expanse of the eternal city is truly memorable.
The hotel attracts a jet set crowd of international

Book of the week: Evelyn Waugh: A Life Revisited

A new addition to the shelf of Waugh biographies is crisp, diligent and sympathetic, says James Fergusson. Evelyn Waugh: A Life Revisited
Philip Eade (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £30)
For Anthony Powell, Evelyn Waugh was ‘the most naturally gifted writer of his generation’. He was also, Powell wrote on Waugh’s death, ‘one of the few people I have known who could be uproariously funny when drunk’ —which, from a reading of Waugh’s published diaries, was (when he wasn’t writing) most of the time. Often, he was more than drunk; he was ‘D. D.’—disgustingly drunk. That he wrote so much and so well was

Waterside homes from Cornwall to Cumbria

These idyllic waterside homes boast beautiful views and sporting opportunities. Country Life finds the best waterside homes for sale this summer around the country, from Cornwall to Cumbria
Little End in Salcombe launched at the beginning of June with a guide price of £925,000 and exchanged the day after the referendum. Marchand Petit (01548 844473)
If anything proves that the holiday market is driven by different sentiments than other residential property markets, it’s the recent experience of Harriet Cundy of Marchand Petit in Salcombe. The office launched Little End, a sweet four-bedroom cottage in the fashionable Devon resort, which boasted 180-degree views

Country houses for sale in Ireland

There are a number of tempting country houses on the market in Ireland this year As the shock waves caused by Britain’s decision to leave the EU continue to reverberate around the world, the consternation felt in Ireland at the likely effects of the Brexit vote on the country’s economy is alleviated among those involved in the Irish country-house market by the sector’s increasingly diverse and international buyer profile.
Historic-house specialist David Ashmore of Sotheby’s Realty’s new Ireland office explains: ‘Although British-based buyers have always exerted a major influence on the luxury-home market in Ireland, in recent years, they have represented

Planning an English country wedding

Part 1: The engagementJoin Country Life’s Annunciata Walton from engagement through to ‘I do’, as she tracks the highs and lows of planning a rural wedding up north (from London)
Part 1: The Engagement
Rabbits were everywhere, lolling on lawns, rolling in flowerbeds—this Sussex garden is where it started, with a ring and a bunch of bunnies.
‘Do you think this hotel has a rabbit problem?’ I said, pre-proposal, as my fiancé-to-be had an awkward tussle with his jumper. He’d tied it round his waist, which was unusual. Later on, he explained that the box wouldn’t fit in his trouser pocket, so he’d

My favourite painting: Peter Blake

‘It was exciting to find a fellow artist working on similar themes to what I was doing.’Orthodox BoysOrthodox Boys, 1948, by Bernard Perlin (1918–2014), 30in by 40in, Tate Collection.
Peter Blake says:
‘I first saw Orthodox Boys at the Tate Gallery in the 1950s, when I was working on paintings like Boys With Badges while at the Royal College of Art. It was exciting to find a fellow artist working on similar themes to what I was doing. My interest extended to other Magic Realists, such as Ben Shahn, and it was wonderful to be aware of these paintings being made across